Hoarworld

Aug 20

jetpackexhaust:

If there was ever any doubt* that Dr McNinja is perfect joy, this story arc title eliminates it.
*THERE WAS NEVER ANY SUCH DOUBT

jetpackexhaust:

If there was ever any doubt* that Dr McNinja is perfect joy, this story arc title eliminates it.

*THERE WAS NEVER ANY SUCH DOUBT

thefinalimage:

How did Eren Celeboglu get Zach Braff to star in his first short film? 
In the months leading up to our short film festival (submissions now welcome!), The Final Image will be talking to filmmakers both inside and out of the industry, amateurs and professionals who have made their own short films while pursuing feature film work.
This week, we got in touch with Eren Celeboglu, a writer and director who got his chops working on the beloved NBC sitcom Scrubs. After majoring in English and creative writing at Hobart College, Eren moved to Los Angeles where he worked in the mailroom of a boutique literary agency that represented writers and directors. After getting work for a motion picture literary agent, Eren began to understand the day-to-day business of screenwriting, watching writers deliver scripts they had been paid for or listening to them pitch over the phone to his boss. “I thought to myself, I can do that,” he says.
[Read more]

thefinalimage:

How did Eren Celeboglu get Zach Braff to star in his first short film? 

In the months leading up to our short film festival (submissions now welcome!), The Final Image will be talking to filmmakers both inside and out of the industry, amateurs and professionals who have made their own short films while pursuing feature film work.

This week, we got in touch with Eren Celeboglu, a writer and director who got his chops working on the beloved NBC sitcom Scrubs. After majoring in English and creative writing at Hobart College, Eren moved to Los Angeles where he worked in the mailroom of a boutique literary agency that represented writers and directors. After getting work for a motion picture literary agent, Eren began to understand the day-to-day business of screenwriting, watching writers deliver scripts they had been paid for or listening to them pitch over the phone to his boss. “I thought to myself, I can do that,” he says.

[Read more]

[video]

liquidnight:

Jérôme Prince
La passerelle de Solférino
[From the Réunion des Musées Nationaux]

liquidnight:

Jérôme Prince

La passerelle de Solférino

[From the Réunion des Musées Nationaux]

(via mudwerks)

tastefullyoffensive:

[@blackcatbettie]

tastefullyoffensive:

[@blackcatbettie]

(Source: greaterland)

why-i-love-comics:

Thunderbolts #24

written by Charles Souleart by Paco Diaz Luque

why-i-love-comics:

Thunderbolts #24

written by Charles Soule
art by Paco Diaz Luque

[video]

cracked:

Yes yes but does it still have good maple syrup?
25 Parts of the World We All Picture Incorrectly

cracked:

Yes yes but does it still have good maple syrup?

25 Parts of the World We All Picture Incorrectly

comicbookcovers:

The Question #3, March 2005, cover by Tommy Lee Edwards

comicbookcovers:

The Question #3, March 2005, cover by Tommy Lee Edwards

medievalpoc:

hoganddice:

medievalpoc:

thegreatgadfly:

medievalpoc:

[more on Xiang Fei]
*coughcough* paging rejectedprincesses *coughcough*

*sigh*
It’s a legend, you ignorant fucks. No one knows whether there is any historical basis whatsoever. And it’s not nearly as glorious a legend as you’d think from looking at that one picture.

Oh, she was a real person. If you read the link (and the links at the link like so-(Mungello p 68, 69), you’ll notice I get into the documentation and how her story has been used and told from diverse perspectives. Just because there are legends about Napoleon Bonaparte or Genghis Khan, doesn’t make them nothing but legends.
I think your response says a lot about the point I’m trying to make here, though. Are we ready as a culture for Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter…but not Xiang Fei?

Folklorist here ready to chime in.There’s a lot of different kinds of folklore Myths, Legends, Folk Tales, Marchen, and so on and so on.These are not all different names for the same thing, they are all individual classifications.Legend is the classification we give to tales that have some basis in historical fact.They are not, strictly speaking, entirely true, elements of other story classifications creep in, but their will be strong and pervasive elements of historical truth in anything officially classified as a legend.

And here’s the thing.
We could literally have the same argument over Medieval Butt Music: “Legend” or Fact?? I say, well, it is a fact that Europeans often depicted people with trumpets and flutes in their butts. And you can say, well it’s intellectually dishonest to say that because we can’t know for SURE if there were literally people putting trumpets in their butts. And I could say, well, if anyone tried it, it was definitely Hieronymous Bosch. Or the folks behind the Luttrell Psalter. We could have an entire Medieval Butt Music conference and convention, and bring stuff from every discipline, and debate it to the bones.
^^ THAT is trivial.
Showing people how incredibly diverse images from history can be, including European history, is NOT trivial to the people who’ve been pushed under the rug, erased, or relegated to footnotes, “unverifiables”, and “legends”.
^^That is IMPORTANT.
As long as “you have no history” is being used to disenfranchise Americans of color, it will continue to be important. I mention that there are several untranslated academic papers in Chinese that I can only find small quotes from in English papers that relegate this work to a footnote. One source I used basically  uses her to go on a rant against feminism.
THESE are the sources I’m working with, here. These works EXIST. What we “know” about them is affected by the SOCIETY we live in. That. Is. A. Fact.

medievalpoc:

hoganddice:

medievalpoc:

thegreatgadfly:

medievalpoc:

[more on Xiang Fei]

*coughcough* paging rejectedprincesses *coughcough*

*sigh*

It’s a legend, you ignorant fucks. No one knows whether there is any historical basis whatsoever. And it’s not nearly as glorious a legend as you’d think from looking at that one picture.

Oh, she was a real person. If you read the link (and the links at the link like so-(Mungello p 68, 69), you’ll notice I get into the documentation and how her story has been used and told from diverse perspectives. Just because there are legends about Napoleon Bonaparte or Genghis Khan, doesn’t make them nothing but legends.

I think your response says a lot about the point I’m trying to make here, though. Are we ready as a culture for Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter…but not Xiang Fei?

Folklorist here ready to chime in.

There’s a lot of different kinds of folklore Myths, Legends, Folk Tales, Marchen, and so on and so on.

These are not all different names for the same thing, they are all individual classifications.

Legend is the classification we give to tales that have some basis in historical fact.
They are not, strictly speaking, entirely true, elements of other story classifications creep in, but their will be strong and pervasive elements of historical truth in anything officially classified as a legend.

And here’s the thing.

We could literally have the same argument over Medieval Butt Music: “Legend” or Fact?? I say, well, it is a fact that Europeans often depicted people with trumpets and flutes in their butts. And you can say, well it’s intellectually dishonest to say that because we can’t know for SURE if there were literally people putting trumpets in their butts. And I could say, well, if anyone tried it, it was definitely Hieronymous Bosch. Or the folks behind the Luttrell Psalter. We could have an entire Medieval Butt Music conference and convention, and bring stuff from every discipline, and debate it to the bones.

^^ THAT is trivial.

Showing people how incredibly diverse images from history can be, including European history, is NOT trivial to the people who’ve been pushed under the rug, erased, or relegated to footnotes, “unverifiables”, and “legends”.

^^That is IMPORTANT.

As long as “you have no history” is being used to disenfranchise Americans of color, it will continue to be important. I mention that there are several untranslated academic papers in Chinese that I can only find small quotes from in English papers that relegate this work to a footnote. One source I used basically  uses her to go on a rant against feminism.

THESE are the sources I’m working with, here. These works EXIST. What we “know” about them is affected by the SOCIETY we live in. That. Is. A. Fact.